CHEMICAL & BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING

Course Electives

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CHEG648-010 Biomaterials in Drug Delivery

Fall 2017
3 credit hours
Time/Location: Tuesdays & Thursdays 3:30-4:45 PM
Intructor(s): Sullivan, Millicent O.
Teaching Assistant: Rachel Lieser

Application of biomolecular engineering principles to the design and assembly of biomaterials with specific applications in drug and gene delivery, evaluation of host and cellular-level responses to biomaterials, understanding and application of key principles in targeted delivery and controlled release.

Useful reference texts:

  1. S. Bhatia, "Biomaterials for Clinical Applications"
  2. B. Ratner et al., "Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine", Second edition
  3. R. Lanza et al., "Principles of Tissue Engineering, Second edition"
  4. B. Alberts et al., "Molecular Biology of the Cell"

Course Goals:

  • Understand the biological environment and its response to engineered materials
  • Develop and evaluate application-specific biomaterials design criteria
  • Understand the experimental and mathematical approaches to biomaterials testing and analysis
  • Understand the principles of tissue engineering and controlled drug delivery
  • Understand the clinical constraints and approval process for biomaterials

SAKAI

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CHEG667-011 SEMINAR Applied Mathematics Topics with Applications to Transport Phenomena

1 credit hours
Time/Location:
Lectures TBA Tue & Thu 6:00-8:45 PM; 08/29 - 09/12*
Project Presentations TBA Tue 6:00-8:45 PM; 09/26*
*The times are indicative only - can change to accommodate all participants
Instructor(s):
Prof. Kostas D. Housiadas, Dept. Mathematics, Aegean Univ.
Visiting Professor
Office house: To be arranged & by appointment

Anotny N. Beris
Office house: by appointment

The scope of this one credit special course is to introduce qualified undergraduate and graduate Chemical Engineering students to important, powerful, mathematical tools of analysis. In particular, perturbation and asymptotic methods, with their required symbolic manipulations carried out by the “MATHEMATICA” software, will be discussed in order to find analytical solutions to important problems in transport phenomena and fluid mechanics. The biggest advantage is the hands-on experience offered in using the Mathematica software in symbolic algebra manipulations. In this increasingly more uncertain world, software skills acquired by hands-on experience can make the competitive difference. Not to be missed!

Prerequisites: The scope of this one credit special course is to introduce qualified undergraduate and graduate Chemical Engineering students to important, powerful, mathematical tools of analysis. In particular, perturbation and asymptotic methods, with their required symbolic manipulations carried out by the "MATHEMATICA" software, will be discussed in order to find analytical solutions to important problems in transport phenomena and fluid mechanics. The biggest advantage is the hands-on experience offered in using the Mathematica software in symbolic algebra manipulations. In this increasingly more uncertain world, software skills acquired by hands-on experience can make the competitive difference. Not to be missed!

Course Syllabus

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CHEG670-010 Particle Rate Processes

Fall 2017
3 credit hours
Time/Location: Tuesdays & Thusdays 3:30-4:45 PM
Instructor(s): Diemer Jr., Russell Bertrum; Michaels, James

Analysis of physicochemical fundamentals and rate equations for key particle formation, growth and size reduction processes including: physical and chemical nucleation, accretional growth mechanisms, collisional growth, droplet and bubble coalescence, solid-state sintering, dissolution and comminution.

Prerequisites:

  • CHEG332 or equivalent undergraduate Kinetics
  • About this section: Requires permission of instructor

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CHEG671-010 Particle Transport

Fall 2017
3 credit hours
Time/Location: Mondays 5:00-8:00 PM
Instructor(s): Etchells, Arthur W; Tilton, James Nelson;
Grenville, Richard K., Bell, Timothy A

Analysis of the fundamentals of particle motion and their applications to transport processes involving particles, including granular and powder flows, dense and lean-phase pneumatic conveying, and slurry flows.

Prerequisites:

  • CHEG341 or equivalent undergraduate fluid mechanics
  • About this section: Requires permission of instructor

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CHEG672-010 Mathematics of Particle Systems

Fall 2017
1 credit hours
Time/Location: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays 11:15 AM-12:05 PM
Instructor(s): Diemer Jr., Russell Bertrum

Analysis of population balance modeling in particulate systems with application to the design of particle-based unit operations. The course will drawn on elements of linear analysis, ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations as needed to enable the solution of mathematical models of particulate systems based on the rate kernels.

Prerequisites:

  • MATH305 or equivalent undergraduate differential equations
  • About this section: Requires permission of instructor

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CHEG673-010 Particle Properties & Characterization

Fall 2017
Time/Location: Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:30-1:45 PM in PRS304
Instructor(s): Michaels, James

Analysis of particle properties, including single particle, aggregated particle, and particle population descriptors and the various techniques available for sampling, measurement and characterization particle systems. These include methods based on sedimentation, light scattering, particle charging, and microscopy.

Prerequisites:

  • CHEM444 or equivalent undergraduate level physical chemistry
  • CHEG325 or equivalent undergraduate thermodynamics
  • About this section: Requires permission of instructor

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CHEG816 Systems Biology of Cells in Engineered Environments

Fall 2016
3 credit hours
Time/Location: Wednesdays 4:00-6:30 PM
Instructor(s): Powers, Thomas M.

Provides a technical review of systems biology approaches including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and bioinformatics as well as applications in tissue engineering, stem cell differentiation, and drug delivery. Intended for PhD students in interdisciplinary life science and engineering programs.

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CHEG867-012 Protein and Cellular Engineering

Fall 2017
3 credit hours
Time/Location: Tuesdays & Thursdays 3:30-4:45 PM in MEM125
Instructor(s): Chen, Wilfred

Course Topics:

  1. Recombinant protein production - bacteria, yeast, and mammalian host systems.
  2. Cell sorting and selection strategies.
  3. Protein secretion, folding, and aggregation.
  4. Protein engineering - rational approaches.
  5. Protein engineering - directed evolution.
  6. Protein engineering - computational approaches.
  7. Industrial strain development.
  8. Engineered cells/Biomolecular systems for other applications: biofuels, environmental remediation.

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CHEM622-010 Electroanalytical Chemistry

Fall 2017
3 credit hours
Time/Location: Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:00 AM-12:15 AM in BRL116
Instructor(s): Brown, Steven David

This course is an introduction to theory of analytical electrochemistry. An emphasis is placed on the physical chemistry of electrode processes with applications in analytical chemistry. The course follows the text Electrochemical Methods, 2nd Ed., Wiley, 2001, by A.J. Bard and L.R. Faulkner. This text is a mathematical, encyclopedic, challenging work. It is also the standard text for any graduate course in electrochemistry. Electrochemistry is a well-established field and many areas are not changing, so the book has most of what you will need. However, there are some areas of more rapid change and so the book is becoming dated in places. The instructor will supplement the book with current literature as appropriate. The course considers potentiometry and Donnan equilibrium for selective ion measurements; basic electrode structure and its consequences for electrode reactions; Tafel law, Butler-Volmer theory and electrode kinetics; transient measurements in time, potential scan methods and the quest to minimize capacitive effects; electrochemical impedance "spectroscopy" (EIS) is covered when time permits.

Requirements &Prerequisites:
Students in the course are expected to have had introductory courses in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics at the level of undergraduate physical chemistry. The course covers topics that include analytical and numerical solution of partial differential equations. Mathematical background beyond calculus is helpful, but not essential, to performing well in this course.

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CHEM641-011 Biochemistry

Fall 2017
3 credit hours
Time/Location: Tuesdays & Thursdays 3:30 PM-4:45 PM; Saturdays 10:00 AM-12:00 PM
Instructor(s): Wingrave, James A.

Structure and function of proteins, enzymes and coenzymes; kinetics and mechanisms; carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation; and citric acid cycle.

Prerequisites:

  • CHEM322 or CHEM332

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CHEM685-010 COLLOID CHEMISTRY

Fall 2017
3 credit hours
Time/Location: Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:00 AM-12:15 PM in BRL106
Instructor(s): Wingrave, James A.

Introduction of the principles of colloid chemistry and discussion of applications including; surface and interfacial tension, capillarity, interfacial adsorption, adsorption isotherms, adhesion, contact angles, surface wetting and dewetting, emulsification, foaming and defoaming, interfacial thermodynamics and electrostatics, etc.

This course is or you if you ever wondered:

  1. why water wicks against gravity into paper or cloth,
  2. how surfactants cause foams and stabilize emulsions,
  3. why nanotubes are necessary to store hydrogen fuel in fuel tanks,
  4. how ‘wine tears’ form,
  5. why a GORETEX jacket is waterproof but a cotton jacket is not,
  6. how STAIN MASTER fabric treatment makes a fabric stain-resistant,
  7. why it’s so hard to pull two wet glass plates apart,
  8. how detergency works,
  9. and many more.

Lecture Number & Topics

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MATH567-010 Topics in Mathematics - Topology and Its Applications

Fall 2017
3 credit hours
Time/Location: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays 12:20-1:10 PM
Instructor(s): Giusti, Chad (a researcher in Topology and its Applications, will be joining the UD Math Department in Fall 2017).

Survey of combinatorial and algebraic topology with a focus on modern applications. Topics include topological manifolds, simplicial and cell complexes, categories, homological algebra over a field, and persistent homology, applications to molecular and biochemistry, sensor networks, signal processing, neuroscience, game theory, and robotics.

Prerequisites:

  • A course in linear algebra such as MATH 349 or MATH 351
  • A course in computer programming such as CISC 106 or 108
  • Or permission of instructor. Students should be comfortable writing proofs and computer programs.

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PHYS838-010 Advanced Molecular Science

Fall 2017
3 credit hours
Time/Location: Mondays & Fridays 3:35 PM-4:50 PM
Instructor(s): Szalewicz, Krysztof

Selected topics from: quantum field theory, renormalization group and critical phenomena, nuclear theory, elementary particles and applications of group theory in physics.

Prerequisites:
Knowledge of quantum mechanics is needed. Knowledge at the level of Shankar book will be completely adequate. Knowledge at the level of Griffith may require some selfstudy of a higher-level textbook during the semester, but mostly should be sufficient.

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