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Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at UD making a difference


2017


FOCUSING ENERGY RESEARCH: UD scientists develop new theory to help improve catalysis research

Dec. 1, 2017--A new theory by researchers at the University of Delaware-led Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) will help bring greater accuracy and focus to molecular science research, with the potential for far-reaching impact across multiple industries. The findings— reported by UD graduate student researchers Joshua Lansford and Alexander Mironenko with support from CCEI director Dionisios Vlachos—establish predictive capability for the behavior of molecules called adsorbates. Adsorption is a process by which molecules of gas, liquid or dissolved solids adhere to a surface, including metals such as iron, copper, nickel and titanium.


THE FUEL CELL AUTHORITY: UD’s Yushan Yan recognized for advances in energy technology

Dec. 1, 2017--Yushan Yan has received the Electrochemical Society (ECS) Energy Technology Division Research Award for 2018. Yan is a Distinguished Engineering Professor and Associate Dean for Research and Entrepreneurship in the University of Delaware’s College of Engineering. The Electrochemical Society advances electrochemical and solid state science and technology. Its Energy Technology Division focuses on energy conversion through technologies such as fuel cells, electrolyzers, flow batteries, and more. The ECS Energy Technology Division Research Award recognizes researchers whose achievements will likely impact future research and development in the field.


BUILDING THE FUTURE WITH BIOPHARMACEUTICALS: Groundbreaking shows strength of UD commitment to NIIMBL partnership, research

Oct. 24, 2017--It seemed like a pipe dream to Kelvin Lee, Gore Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering - this idea that the University of Delaware might find room for a place where innovation in biopharmaceuticals could happen. He wished for 60,000 square feet of space. But how could that work? UD President Dennis Assanis had even bigger ideas. "Why settle for 60,000 square feet," Lee recalled Assanis saying, "when the University could build 200,000 square feet at the STAR Campus?"


UD’S EPPS NAMED AMERICAN PHYSICAL SOCIETY FELLOW: Chemical engineering and materials science professor joins the top 0.5 percent of society members

Oct. 24, 2017--Thomas H. Epps, III, the Thomas & Kipp Gutshall Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been named a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS).


A NOTE OF THANKS: Students gather to write thank you notes to University donors

Oct. 13, 2017--Each year, thousands of University of Delaware donors give money for scholarships, awards, programs, facilities and countless other areas that help Blue Hens advance their educations. For these students, personally thanking those who support their UD experience is meaningful. On Sept. 27, more than 500 students attended Gratitude Gala and thoughtfully crafted messages of appreciation to the alumni, friends, parents, faculty and staff who help make their UD experience possible. Richard Egan, a senior in the College of Engineering and recipient of the Schipper Undergraduate Chemical Engineering Scholarship wrote to his scholarship donor Dr. Paul H. Schipper.


MODELING NEW MATERIALS: UD engineer Arthi Jayaraman uncovers molecular mysteries

Oct. 2, 2017--Jayaraman is building better models right here at UD. For this research, she along with collaborators Ryan Hayward of University of Massachusetts Amherst and Paul Butler of National Institutes of Standards and Technology have been awarded a $726,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences.


SAFER, TOUGHER SPACESUITS: NASA supports UD technology that protects spacesuits from punctures, projectiles

Sep. 28, 2017--NASA sees great promise in a new protective textile - the shear thickening fluid technology co-developed at the University of Delaware by Norman Wagner, Unidel Robert L. Pigford Chair in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and STF Technologies, the company he co-founded with UD alum Richard Dombrowski.


ENGINEERING DEAN NAMED TO CHEMICAL HERITAGE BOARD: Ogunnaike brings academic and industry experience to the Chemical Heritage Foundation board of directors

Sep. 22, 2017--Babatunde Ogunnaike, William L. Friend Chair and dean of the University of Delaware College of Engineering, has been named to the board of directors of the Chemical Heritage Foundation. His term extends until June 30, 2020. The Chemical Heritage Foundation, based in Philadelphia, preserves scientific history and examines how science has shaped modern life. "This is a wonderful opportunity to serve the scientific community and beyond," says Ogunnaike. He adds: "It’s humbling to be selected for this group."


U.S. NEWS RANKS UD AT NO. 33 AMONG TOP PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES: Undergrad chemical engineering program ranked 9th

Sep. 12, 2017--The University of Delaware is ranked 33rd among national public universities in U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges 2018 edition, placing it in the top 17 percent of public universities evaluated. Overall, UD is 81st among more than 300 public, private and for-profit national universities reviewed. In specific discipline rankings, UD is ninth in the nation among undergraduate chemical engineering programs where the highest engineering degree offered is a doctorate. Overall, UD’s undergraduate engineering program is ranked at 56, up two spots from last year’s ranking of 58.


MAKING BETTER MATERIAL FOR FUEL CELLS: UD researchers make material to make fuel cells more durable, less expensive

Sep. 4, 2017--Take a ride on the University of Delaware’s Fuel Cell bus, and you see that fuel cells can power vehicles in an eco-friendly way. In just the last two years, Toyota, Hyundai and Honda have released vehicles that run on fuel cells, and carmakers such as GM, BMW and VW are working on prototypes. If their power sources lasted longer and cost less, fuel cell vehicles could go mainstream faster. Now, a team of engineers at UD has developed a technology that could make fuel cells cheaper and more durable.


THREE NEW ENGINEERING CHAIRS: CBE, CEE and ME departments have new leadership

Aug. 25, 2017--The University of Delaware’s College of Engineering is pleased to announce the appointment of three new department chairs. "These faculty members are already trailblazers in their fields, and I anticipate that they will be outstanding departmental leaders," said Babatunde Ogunnaike, dean of the College of Engineering.


RESEARCHERS ATTEND NATAS CONFERENCE AT UD: Thermal analysis conference includes honor for late UD professor

Aug. 16, 2017--Researchers from 10 different countries gathered at the University of Delaware Aug. 7-11 for the 2017 44th annual North American Thermal Analysis Society (NATAS) conference. NATAS promotes the science and practice of thermal analysis, the study of materials as they change temperature. At the conference held in Clayton Hall, a group of 174 researchers participated in dozens of sessions on topics such as thermal hazards, rheology and viscoelasticity and energetic materials.


UD TEAMS GET MILLIONS IN NSF FUNDING

Aug. 2, 2017--The University of Delaware’s K. Eric Wommack, deputy dean in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, will lead a research team from four universities that has received a $6 million grant to probe how viruses impact microbes critical to our lives, from producing oxygen to growing food. Also, UD’s Kelvin Lee, Gore Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, is a co-investigator on a $6.1 million research project, led by Clemson University, aimed at lowering drug manufacturing costs.


MILESTONE ANNIVERSARY: Chemical engineering’s Stan Sandler reaches 50-year mark as UD faculty member

Jul. 10, 2017--Stan Sandler usually takes the steps to get to his second-floor office in the University of Delaware’s Colburn Lab. But today he’s taking the elevator because he’s hauling two black bags filled with heavy books — books that will be added to a growing pile destined to be shipped to developing countries including Nigeria and Ethiopia. It’s easy to accumulate a lot of books over the course of an academic career, especially one that spans half a century, and, even with 150 or 200 books already boxed up, the shelves in Sandler’s office are far from empty.


FACULTY SENATE: May meeting features faculty honors, presentations by provost and by outgoing Senate president

May 4, 2017--The Faculty Senate held its last meeting of the spring semester on Monday, May 1, immediately after the General Faculty Meeting with UD President Dennis Assanis. Highlighting the meeting were the presentation of several faculty awards, a report from Provost Domenico Grasso and a farewell from outgoing Senate President Prasad Dhurjati. In addition to the Faculty Excellence Awards announced earlier this week in UDaily, the Faculty Senate also presented Jim Morrison, professor in the School of Public Policy and Administration, with the 2017 Jon Olson Exemplary Senate Service Award.


DUAL DOCTORAL PROGRAM: Agreement promotes collaboration with National Chung Hsing University in Taiwan

Apr. 28, 2017--On April 25, Fuh-Sheng Shieu, president of the National Chung Hsing University in Taiwan, visited the University of Delaware to sign an agreement for a cooperative program that encompasses teaching, research, consultation and faculty and student exchanges. The agreement is a renewal of one executed several years ago and has since been expanded through various supplemental agreements for specific programs, including the opportunity for students to earn doctoral degrees from both institutions in the areas of civil and environmental engineering and soil and environmental science.


DISCOVERY COULD TRANSFORM INDUSTRIES: Researchers invent process to make sustainable rubber, plastics

Apr. 24, 2017--Synthetic rubber and plastics – used for manufacturing tires, toys and myriad other products – are produced from butadiene, a molecule traditionally made from petroleum or natural gas. But those manmade materials could get a lot greener soon, thanks to the ingenuity of a team of scientists from three U.S. research universities. The scientific team –- from the University of Delaware, the University of Minnesota and the University of Massachusetts – has invented a process to make butadiene from renewable sources like trees, grasses and corn.


HOW MATH COULD MAKE BONES STRONGER: Models help UD researchers calculate best dosage for osteoporosis treatment

Mar. 29, 2017--They may seem rigid and set in their ways, but your bones are actually under constant construction and deconstruction. They give up their nutrient treasures (calcium) to the body and then rebuild in a constant give-and-take sort of rhythm. When that rhythm shifts with advancing age or the onset of osteoporosis, the rebuilding process decreases. Bones lose density and strength and become more prone to fracture. More than 10 million people in the United States live with osteoporosis and the resulting fractures demand more than $17 billion in related health care each year. Now two University of Delaware researchers and their students have joined forces - applying the mathematical modeling expertise of one to the biological inquiry of the other - to point the way to a promising remedy.


TALENT ARTICLE: Epps team highlights work on tuning block polymers for nanostructured systems

Mar. 28, 2017--Epps, who is the Thomas and Kipp Gutshall Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and professor of Materials Science and Engineering at UD, and two of his graduate students, Melody Morris and Thomas Gartner, recently published an article highlighting this work in Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics. The piece was a “Talent” submission, a unique article type dedicated to young scientists.


NSF GRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS: Twelve UD students, alumni win prestigious research support

Mar. 28, 2017--A dozen University of Delaware students (undergraduate and graduate) and alumni have won National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships as the prestigious competition marks its 65th year. Fourteen others received honorable mention designations. The awards -- for which more than 13,000 applicants competed this year -- include three years of funding at $34,000 per year, plus $12,000 in cost-of-education allowances to the school for study leading to a master's or doctoral degree in science and engineering. The total of these awards is almost $1.4 million -- a significant boost for the students and their research.


APRIL 14: LEARN ABOUT NIIMBL, RAPID: Presentation set on NIIMBL and Rapid USA Manufacturing Institutes

Apr. 14, 2017--A public presentation on NIIMBL and RAPID, two USA Manufacturing Institutes in which the University of Delaware is playing key roles, will be held at 4 p.m., Friday, April 14, in the Trabant University Center Theater. All are welcome to attend.


GRADUATE RANKINGS: UD graduate programs make gains in new US News rankings

Mar. 14, 2017--The University’s chemical engineering program continues to rank among the nation’s premier graduate programs, and moved up three spots from last year. The program is tied at No. 6 with the Georgia Institute of Technology, Princeton University, the University of Texas, Austin, and the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology was U.S. News’ top-ranked program.


SXSW RESEARCH VIDEO: UD professor featured in American Chemical Society video at SXSW

Mar. 13, 2017--The hipsters, thought leaders and innovators attending the South by Southwest (SXSW) Festival in Austin, Texas, this week are being introduced to some University of Delaware innovation that’s designed to help people both here on the ground and rocketing off into space. In a video being premiered by the American Chemical Society at SXSW, UD professor Norman Wagner and his interdisciplinary team’s work with shear thickening fluids is showcased — in applications ranging from bullet-proof vests, to needlestick-resistant surgical gloves, concussion-resistant helmets, next-generation prosthetics and even spacesuits.


FROM CARBON DIOXIDE TO FUEL: UD’s Feng Jiao wins DOE funding to produce alcohols from CO2 flue gas

Feb. 23, 2017--Modern society’s extensive use of fossil fuels has led to unprecedented atmospheric carbon dioxide levels with widespread climate impacts. Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration is one of the technologies under investigation to mitigate CO2 emissions associated with coal-fired power plants. However, according to the University of Delaware’s Feng Jiao, large-scale CO2 sequestration poses risks to the environment from leakage. Other disadvantages include limited efficient geological repositories and high transportation and compression costs.


GO AWAY GREENHOUSE GAS: NSF Career Award to focus on electrochemical reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide

Feb. 15, 2017--The University of Delaware’s Bingjun Xu has received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award to address electrochemical reduction of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. The five-year, $523,000 grant, "Elucidating Molecular Level Interplay Between Catalysts and Electrolytes in Electrochemical Reduction of CO2," was awarded through NSF’s Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems.


APRIL 17: NAMED PROFESSOR LECTURE - UD’s Dion Vlachos will address global energy, water, food needs

Feb. 13, 2017--The University of Delaware’s Dion Vlachos, who has been named the Allan and Myra Ferguson Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, will deliver his inaugural lecture at 4 p.m., Monday, April 17, in Room 104 Gore Hall. A reception will follow at 5 p.m. in the DuPont Hall Lobby. Those who plan to attend should RSVP by email to Sue Zatto.


OLD ENZYME, NEW ROLE: Nature Communications paper reports new role for enzyme involved in bacterial metabolism

Jan. 27, 2017--A team of researchers at the University of Delaware has discovered a new function for an enzyme that has long been known to have a central role in bacterial metabolism. Maciek Antoniewicz, Centennial Junior Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, explains that metabolism is the set of chemical reactions that takes place inside cells to maintain life by breaking down substrate molecules such as sugars and generating energy and new cell components.


GILMAN AWARDEES TAKE FLIGHT: Students receive prestigious awards to study abroad in Panama, Singapore

Jan. 24, 2017--University of Delaware undergraduates Julian Jackson and Richard Egan have begun their first global experiences thanks to the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program. The Gilman Scholarship program, funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, awards competitive grants to students from underrepresented backgrounds to pursue academic studies or credit-bearing, career-oriented internships abroad.


SUPPORTING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Delaware Bioscience CAT program fosters local collaborations, start-ups

Jan. 6, 2017--The Delaware Bioscience Center for Advanced Technology (Bioscience CAT) has awarded six new Applied Research Collaborations (ARC) or Entrepreneurial Proof of Concept (EPoC) grants. E. Terry Papoutsakis, Unidel Eugene du Pont Chair of Chemical Engineering at UD, is planning to use EPoC funds to develop a new hybrid technology to target stem cells for drug delivery so treatments can be more effective in smaller doses.


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2016


MANUFACTURING USA HEADQUARTERS: Secretary of Commerce visits UD to announce new institute

Dec. 16, 2016--Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker visited the University of Delaware today, where she announced a new institute to advance U.S. leadership in pharmaceutical manufacturing. The Newark-based National Institute for Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL) will be the 11th Manufacturing USA Institute. The institute will focus on bringing safe drugs to market faster and on developing workforce training. The biopharmaceutical field has a negative unemployment rate, with more jobs available than there are qualified workers.


RAPID BREAKTHROUGHS: UD to lead major node of new national chemical manufacturing institute

Dec. 12, 2016--The University of Delaware will lead a major node of RAPID focusing on catalysis and reactors, and also will be involved in other dimensions of RAPID’s research and development agenda led by other universities, according to Dion Vlachos, UD’s Allan and Myra Ferguson Chair of Chemical Engineering. Vlachos will guide the University’s effort.


MASTER CLASS IN UD RESEARCH: Five show powerful global impact of faculty and student work

Dec. 8, 2016--Five of the University's world-class researchers, from different disciplines and bents of mind, converged Dec. 7 to share highlights of their work and the impact it is having around the world in a symposium called "Ideas That Dare To Change The World." Those in similar fields might know that about each other. Others might attend an interdisciplinary lecture if they can get away from their own work. But there is great power in hearing from an assembly of widely divergent experts about the real-life impact of their research and the potential future gains for families, communities and nations.


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING HONORS: Yan wins AIChE Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum Award

Nov. 21, 2016--Yushan Yan, Distinguished Engineering Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been selected to receive the 2016 Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). He is being honored for "breakthrough contributions to the development of nanoporous thin films and nanocatalysts for fuel cells." The award recognizes outstanding contributions to the advancement of nanoscale science and engineering in the field of chemical engineering through scholarship, education or service.


CARNEGIE AFRICAN DIASPORA FELLOW: Ogunnaike to visit University of Lagos in 2017 to strengthen chemical engineering program

Nov. 14, 2016--Babatunde Ogunnaike, dean of the University of Delaware College of Engineering, has been awarded a fellowship from the Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program. The fellowship will enable him to spend 15 days in early 2017 at the University of Lagos, where he will work with Prof. Adetokunbo Denloye to review and strengthen the master’s program in chemical engineering. Ogunnaike, who is also the William L. Friend Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at UD, was born in Nigeria and earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Lagos.


University of Delaware researcher hopes to find a way to stop breast cancer recurrence

October 31, 2016--A University of Delaware researcher recently received a $450,000 grant from Susan G. Komen to aid in her research to understand the dormancy and reactivation process of breast cancer recurrence. April Kloxin, an assistant professor in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Material Science and Engineering at UD, is studying late cancer recurrence in women with breast cancer.


'PERFECT' SOAP MOLECULE: Discovery could have major impact on multibillion-dollar cleaning products industry

(Article courtesy of the University of Minnesota Photo by Paul J. Dauenhauer)

October 26, 2016--A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, has invented a new soap molecule made from renewable sources that could dramatically reduce the number of chemicals in cleaning products and their impact on the environment. The soap molecules also worked better than some conventional soaps in challenging conditions such as cold water and hard water. The technology has been patented by the University of Minnesota and is licensed to the new Minnesota-based startup company Sironix Renewables.


'PERFECT' SOAP MOLECULE: Discovery could have major impact on multibillion-dollar cleaning products industry

(Article courtesy of the University of Minnesota Photo by Paul J. Dauenhauer)

October 26, 2016--A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, has invented a new soap molecule made from renewable sources that could dramatically reduce the number of chemicals in cleaning products and their impact on the environment. The soap molecules also worked better than some conventional soaps in challenging conditions such as cold water and hard water. The technology has been patented by the University of Minnesota and is licensed to the new Minnesota-based startup company Sironix Renewables.


BIOFUEL BREAKTHROUGH: PNAS paper reports new approach to methanol utilization

Oct. 24, 2016--Bio-fuels and bio-based chemicals have gained tremendous traction over the past decade as a means to produce alternatives to fossil fuels and to replace bulk chemical production methods that rely on petrochemicals. "Methanol, which can be produced inexpensively from natural gas or renewably through the reduction of carbon dioxide by hydrogen, can serve as a feedstock to produce biofuels, amino acids, and polymers," says the University of Delaware’s Wilfred Chen. "However, the initial reaction in the conversion of methanol to formaldehyde is highly reversible." To overcome this obstacle to methanol utilization, Chen teamed with Eleftherios (Terry) Papoutsakis in the Delaware Biotechnology Institute to develop a biological approach that renders the process irreversible.


DRONING ON: UD’s Bingjun Xu awarded AFOSR Young Investigator grant

Oct. 21, 2016--The University of Delaware's Bingjun Xu is one of 58 scientists and engineers across the U.S. to receive a three-year research grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Young Investigator Program (YIP). The awards this year total $20.8 million.


INCUBATOR OPENS: DTP@STAR welcomes 12 start-ups to new space at STAR Campus

Oct. 14, 2016--Wagner is one of a dozen entrepreneurs occupying space in Delaware Technology Park’s new wet lab incubator on the STAR Campus, which celebrated its official opening Friday, Oct. 14, at an event attended by University, DTP, state and federal officials. The location, more easily stated as DTP@STAR, includes offices, individual labs outfitted to match the needs of startup companies, and shared spaces with equipment for use by all incubator tenants.


NEW BREW IN QUEST FOR BIOFUEL: Mixotrophy twist leads researchers to higher yields, lower emissions

Sep. 30, 2016--Researchers have identified a promising blend of bacteria and synthesis gas that, in laboratory tests, is producing much more acetone than other methods while avoiding the carbon dioxide emissions dilemma. The acetone is a proof-of-concept project with value of its own, but it also could lead to significant advances in the quest to produce biofuels – renewable, sustainable energy from sources that do not add to the planet's carbon pollution.


LITTLE HYBRIDS: NSF grant supports research on assembly of complex hybrid nanomaterials

Sep. 29, 2016--Funded by a four-year grant from the National Science Foundation, Jayaraman — along with UD’s Darrin Pochan, William Johnson from the University of Utah and Karen Wooley from Texas A&M — will address those challenges so that the potential of these materials can be realized in a broad range of applications.


RENEWABLE ENERGY LEADER: Vlachos appointed Ferguson Professor and UD Energy Institute director

Sep. 19, 2016--Dionisios G. Vlachos has been named the inaugural Allan and Myra Ferguson Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware. He also has been appointed director of the UD Energy Institute.


BETTER FUEL CELL MEMBRANES: UD awarded $1.8 million through new ARPA-E program aimed at transforming energy storage, conversion

Sep. 15, 2016--The University of Delaware has been awarded $1.8 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) through its new IONICS (Integration and Optimization of Novel Ion-Conducting Solids) program. IONICS project teams are paving the way for technologies that overcome the limitations of current battery and fuel cell products. Led by Yushan Yan, Distinguished Professor of Engineering, the research at UD will focus on creating a series of polymer-based hydroxide exchange membranes (HEMs).


Fuling the Quest for Green Energy

Aug. 24, 2016--Watch an introduction to the University of Delaware’s Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation—an Energy Frontier Research Center—as wood chips and cornstalks take on a new shade of "green," converted into new fuels and other products. Featured in the image, CCEI Director Dion Vlachos and doctoral student Hannah Nguyen use a model of a catalyst to discuss its structure and properties.


ACS Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering Award

Aug. 26, 2016--Joshua Condon, a doctoral student in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, recently won a best poster award from the American Chemical Society Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering. The poster, “Molecular Simulation Studies of Phase Transitions in Diblock Polymer Conjugates of Elastin-Like Peptides and Collagen Mimicking Peptide Triple Helices,” was co-authored by doctoral student Tyler Martin and assistant professor Arthi Jayaraman. The award was presented at the 2016 ACS National Meeting in Philadelphia on Aug. 24.


SEPT. 1: ACS WEBINAR: Wagner to present on use of shear thickening fluids in protective equipment

Aug. 26, 2016--Norman Wagner, Unidel Robert L. Pigford Chaired Professor in the University of Delaware’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, will deliver an American Chemical Society webinar, "Future Protective Materials for First Responders, Football Players, and Astronauts: Shear Thickening Fluids," on Thursday, Sept. 1, from 2-3 p.m.


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING HONORS: Papoutsakis receives Murphree Award from American Chemical Society

Aug. 23, 2016--Eleftherios (Terry) Papoutsakis, Unidel Eugene du Pont Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has won the E.V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry from the American Chemical Society. The award is sponsored by ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company. Papoutsakis has made significant contributions in the areas of cell culture engineering, metabolic engineering, genetics and genomics, and cell stem- and T-cell bioengineering.


SUPPORTING RESEARCH PARTNERSHIPS: 6 new projects funded through Delaware Bioscience CAT program

Aug. 3, 2016--The Bioscience CAT grants synergize efforts between the academic and industrial bioscience research communities to address the technology innovation gap and promote economic development in Delaware. Projects involve partnerships among principal investigators at Delaware’s academic or research institutions and scientists from Delaware companies.


POLYMER 'PENS': Epps, DuPont receive NSF funding to develop new approach to manufacture nanostructured arrays

Jun. 14, 2016--The University of Delaware’s Thomas H. Epps, III, and a collaborator Kai Qi from DuPont Performance Materials have received a grant from the National Science Foundation to investigate a new approach to the challenge of manufacturing small-scale structures that are cheaper, lighter and defect-free. Applications for the work range from generating master templates for digital information storage devices to developing patterns for portable biosensing arrays that could screen and treat a wide array of diseases.


EXEMPLARY ACHIEVEMENTS: Students honored for dissertations, prof for exceptional mentoring

Jun. 2, 2016--As the University of Delaware recognized more than 160 students who completed their doctoral studies at the Doctoral Hooding Convocation held May 27 on The Green, top prizes went to six students and one faculty member for exceptional achievements. UDaily provides this collection of Provost Domenico Grasso's remarks on each prize winner...


'DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS’: UD alumnus Arup Chakraborty elected to National Academy of Sciences

Jun. 2, 2016--Arup Chakraborty, who earned his doctoral degree in chemical engineering from the University of Delaware in 1988, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of his "distinguished and continuing achievements in original research." Chakraborty is now the Robert T. Haslam Professor of Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is also founding director of the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science. His entire career has been focused on research at the interface of the physical, life and engineering sciences. After a successful early career working on molecular engineering of catalysts and polymers, in 2000 he turned his attention to immunology.


PEACE CORPS PLANS: Graduation and Peace Corps on horizon for two UD seniors

May 31, 2016--Two University of Delaware students, John McCarron and Bridgette Spritz, have been selected as Peace Corps volunteers. Ghana and Rwanda will become home to McCarron and Spritz shortly after this weekend’s Commencement festivities come to an end. In fact, McCarron, an Honors Program student and chemical engineering major, will receive his honor’s degree with distinction, walk in the University's Commencement, attend convocation, and depart on his Peace Corps journey – all in just two short days.


CHRONIC WOUNDS: NIH grant supports research to engineer new biomaterials

May 25, 2016--Sullivan and her colleague Kristi Kiick recently received a $1.4-million grant from the National Institutes of Health for research that could provide a new approach to the treatment of chronic wounds. Combining their expertise in gene delivery and materials design, the two are collaborating with Dr. David Margolis in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine on the four-year project, "Collagen Turnover-Stimulated Gene Delivery to Enhance Chronic Wound Repair."


UDEFEND: Seniors challenged to develop vaccine and diagnostic test for Zika virus

May 24, 2016--Zika virus was first discovered in 1947, but for more than six decades it was regarded as more of a nuisance than a public health emergency — the illness is usually mild, with symptoms lasting a few days to a week after the victim is bitten by an infected mosquito. But 2015 witnessed an alarming connection between the virus and birth defects in children born to infected women, and the quest was on for a test to diagnose the disease and a vaccine to prevent it. One of the "companies" engaged in that quest over the past several months was UDefend, a fictitious manufacturer of biologic vaccines and diagnostics set up at the University of Delaware to challenge chemical engineering seniors in a capstone course, CHEG432 - Chemical Process Analysis. Student teams worked with pairs of advisers from academia and industry in carrying out their projects.


National Lab Day panels: National experts discuss energy generation, grid modernization, security

May 17, 2016--Experts from across the United States gathered at the University of Delaware on Friday, May 13, to participate in National Lab Day. The event included a series of panel discussions related to the overall theme Clean Energy: Challenges and Opportunities on topics including security, power generation, grid modernization and storage.


Engineering honor: Antony Beris named a fellow of Society of Rheology

May 5, 2016--Antony Beris, the Arthur B. Metzner Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been elected a fellow of the Society of Rheology. Fellowship status recognizes a history of distinguished scientific achievement, a significant technological accomplishment and/or outstanding scholarship in the field of rheology. Service to the society is also an important component to fellowship status. The inaugural class of fellows was elected in 2015.


Outstanding seniors: Graduating seniors Jaeger, Galarraga recognized with UDAA's Warner, Taylor awards

May 4, 2016--Emalea Pusey Warner and Alexander J. Taylor Sr. set the bar high for those who would follow in their footsteps by exemplifying what it truly means to be a Blue Hen. Every year, the University of Delaware Alumni Association (UDAA) honors their legacies by recognizing one outstanding woman and man from the graduating class with the Emalea Pusey Warner and Alexander J. Taylor Sr. awards. This year, seniors Rebecca Jaeger and Jonathan Galarraga, both in the University Honors Program, have been selected as the recipients of these prestigious awards based on the leadership, academic success and community service they have each demonstrated during their time at UD.


Chemical engineering honors: Doctoral candidate's work focuses on polymers for self-healing applications

Apr. 27, 2016--Melissa Gordon, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has won an Excellence in Graduate Polymer Research Award from the American Chemical Society (ACS). The 12th Excellence in Graduate Polymer Research Symposium took place at the ACS national meeting, held in San Diego from March 13-17.


Of superheroes and world changers: Two UD professors inducted into National Academy of Inventors

Apr. 21, 2016--You might say that curiosity got the best of University of Delaware inventors Norman J. Wagner III and the late Richard F. Heck. And we've undoubtedly been the beneficiaries of their scientific sleuthing and tinkering. The two were inducted as fellows into the National Academy of Inventors on Friday, April 15, in ceremonies at the United States Patent and Trademark Office in Alexandria, Virginia.


Membrane proteins: COBRE symposium focuses on proteins of interest to health and disease

Apr. 20, 2016--More than 100 scientists and engineers from academia, industry and government turned out for the eighth membrane protein symposium at the University of Delaware on Monday, April 18. The event was sponsored by the COBRE on Membrane Production and Characterization, which is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and led by Abraham M. Lenhoff, Gore Professor of Chemical Engineering in UD’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.


Exceptional research: Gov. Markell announces BioGENEius Challenge, Celebration of Science winners

Delaware Bio will recognize some of the state’s brightest bioscience stars during its 2016 Annual Awards Gala, and nearly all of them have ties to the University of Delaware. The 2016 awards celebrate the outstanding work of the honorees to foster the state’s bioscience presence, including growing the pipeline of educated students and skilled workers as well as cultivating a culture within the state to encourage innovation, service and research. About 300 of the area’s top leaders in science, academics, industry and medicine will fill the DuPont Country Club on Wednesday, April 20, for the sold-out event.


Exceptional research: Gov. Markell announces BioGENEius Challenge, Celebration of Science winners

Apr. 14, 2016--Gov. Jack Markell joined Kelvin Lee, director of the Delaware Biotechnology Institute (DBI), to recognize Delaware students who did exceptional life science research and honor the teachers who have positively influenced their students to strive for great achievements in the sciences on Wednesday, April 6. During the event, awards were presented to the DBI Celebration of Science middle school winners and the Delaware BioGENEius Challenge finalists, honorable mention recipients, and the 2016 state winner.


April 25-26: Energy in Africa: UD-Africa conference to bring together energy scientists, policy experts, industry

Mar. 23, 2016--Power blackouts happen every day in many African countries, and nearly 600 million people on the continent lack access to electricity. However, the continent’s plentiful sunshine, wind and other energy sources could go a long way to filling that void. To discuss such opportunities, the University of Delaware will host leading energy scientists, policy experts and industry representatives from Africa at a conference to be held April 25–26 at UD’s Clayton Hall Conference Center.


Treeing it up: Research team documents design of wood-based polymers

Mar. 3, 2016--Richard Wool was a pioneer in green engineering and author of the first book to systematically describe the chemistry and manufacture of bio-based polymers and composites derived from plants. Although the University of Delaware chemical engineering professor died in 2015, his legacy lives on, not only in the book but also in the inspiration he provided to others. Thomas H. Epps, III, the Thomas and Kipp Gutshall Associate Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at UD, credits Wool with piquing his interest in using trees — specifically, waste from the pulp and paper industry — as a source for new polymers and plastics with "tunable" thermal and flow properties.


Model perfect: Researchers document new approach to dealing with uncertainties in mathematical models

Feb. 22, 2016--Mathematical models are used to predict just about everything from traffic and weather to plant metabolism and industrial biotechnology. However, while they are valuable tools in a broad range of fields, predictive models are still plagued by uncertainties, or errors, and a great deal of effort is directed at determining the extent and effects of these errors.


eutron science awards: Center for Neutron Science researchers Liu, Godfrin recognized

Feb. 12, 2016--Two researchers in the University of Delaware’s Center for Neutron Science have won awards from the Neutron Scattering Society of America. Yun Liu is the recipient of the 2016 Science Prize, and Douglas Godfrin received the 2016 Prize for Outstanding Student Research.


IGERT cohort: Delaware Biotechnology Institute hosts reception for fourth cohort of IGERT trainees

Feb. 10, 2016--The Delaware Biotechnology Institute (DBI) hosted a reception for the newest cohort of six trainees participating in the National Science Foundation-supported Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) program awarded to principal investigator Kelvin Lee, Gore Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware (UD) and director of DBI, on Jan. 27. This is the fourth year of the five-year, $3 million dollar grant for the NSF IGERT program titled Systems Biology of Cells in Engineered Environments (SBE2).


Fuel cell breakthrough: Yan research team reports success with low-cost nickel-based catalyst

Jan. 14, 2016--Planes, Trains and Automobiles is a popular comedy from the 1980s, but there’s nothing funny about the amount of energy consumed by our nation’s transportation sector. This sector — which includes passenger cars, trucks, buses, and rail, marine, and air transport — accounts for more than 20 percent of America’s energy use, mostly in the form of fossil fuels, so the search is on for environmentally friendly alternatives.



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2015


NAI honors: University of Delaware claims two new National Academy of Inventors Fellows

Dec. 15, 2015--The University of Delaware’s Norman J. Wagner and the late Richard F. Heck have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Election to NAI fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who "have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society."


Functional wrinkles: UD grad student wins national award for polymer processing breakthrough

Dec. 8, 2015--Wrinkled hands are the price we pay for spending too much time soaking in the tub or washing dishes. While the wrinkles may not be attractive, they do help us hold onto objects underwater. And, as it turns out, nature really does know best: the pattern of wrinkling on our wet hands seems to be optimized to provide the perfect drainage network for improving our grip. Wrinkled polymers also offer unique properties, but it’s up to engineers to figure out how to control the pattern of wrinkles for optimized performance in applications ranging from coatings to security tagging. Now Stephen Ma, a doctoral student at the University of Delaware, has found an innovative way to create wrinkled patterns on a polymeric surface using light.


AAAS Fellow: College of Engineering's Ogunnaike recognized for advancing science

Nov. 30, 2015--The University of Delaware’s Babatunde Ogunnaike has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society. The association bestows the title of AAAS Fellow on members who are selected by their peers for scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. Ogunnaike, the William L. Friend Chair of Chemical Engineering, was recognized for his distinguished contributions to process control systems, process engineering practice, and systems engineering education. His work addresses both industrial processes and systems biology.


DSM Science and Technology Award Americas 2015 goes to Stephen Ma for breakthrough research in polymer wrinkling

Nov. 13, 2015--Royal DSM, a global science-based company active in health, nutrition and materials, today announced that the DSM Science & Technology Award Americas 2015 has been awarded to Stephen Ma from the University of Delaware, USA. The award recognizes the development of a highly original wrinkling technique to make patterns on the surface of a polymer. This new system could have the potential to open up whole new application fields, ranging from creating artificial tissues, anti-fouling surfaces, optical coatings to tunable lenses.


Neutron Day: Symposium addresses solution of real-world problems with neutrons

Nov. 6, 2015--Neutrons are far too tiny for the human eye to see, but they can help us "see" deep into matter and determine the properties of materials at the subatomic level. Neutrons can behave like microscopic magnets, diffract like waves, or set particles into motion, revealing properties not available using other probes or imaging techniques.


Supporting faculty: Alumni gift to support faculty recruitment, retention in chemical engineering

Oct. 27, 2015--Allan Ferguson was in the very first engineering class taught by the late Jon Olson at the University of Delaware. "He was absolutely brilliant, and here we were, these young, malleable minds, ready to learn the really complex things he would teach us," the 1965 chemical engineering graduate recalls. "And then he gave the first exam." Ferguson flunked, but he wasn’t the only one.


Engineering honors: Epps receives American Physical Society's 2016 John H. Dillon Medal

Oct. 12, 2015--Thomas H. Epps, III, the Thomas and Kipp Gutshall Associate Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been awarded the American Physical Society’s 2016 John H. Dillon Medal for "significant advances in the control, characterization and understanding of polymer nanoscale structure and energetics." The medal recognizes outstanding research accomplishments by young polymer physicists who have demonstrated exceptional research promise early in their careers.


Patched atoms: Energy researchers discover new structure for bimetallic catalysts

Oct. 7, 2015--In the world of catalytic science and technology, the hunt is always on for catalysts that are inexpensive, highly active, and environmentally friendly. Recent efforts have focused on combining two metals, often in a structure where a core of one metal is surrounded by an atom-thick layer of a second one.


AIChE honor: UD's Wilfred Chen wins award for excellence in biochemical engineering

Sep. 24, 2015--Wilfred Chen, Gore Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Delaware, is the recipient of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) 2015 D.I.C. Wang Award for Excellence in Biochemical Engineering. Chen is cited for the creative application of molecular techniques in engineering proteins and microbes to perform an extraordinary range of biotechnological tasks for bioremediation, biocatalysis, biofuel production, bioseparation and biosensing.


Tuning polymer interpenetration: JACS paper presents new science on nanocomposites

Sep. 16, 2015--Polymer nanocomposites are used in a wide range of applications, from automobile parts and tires to high-tech electronics and solar cells. As with traditional composites, the properties of nanocomposites can be tailored to the requirements of specific applications, but achieving those properties can be challenging.


Diversity letter: Engineering deans collectively commit to diversity at White House Demo Day

Aug. 4, 2015--Just three percent of America’s venture capital-backed startups are led by women and only about one percent by African-Americans. And, with capital for innovative startups predominantly available in just a few places, high-growth business creation is a challenge outside a handful of metro hubs. On Tuesday, Aug. 4, President Barack Obama hosted the first-ever White House Demo Day, aimed at changing those numbers to reflect better ethnic, gender and geographic diversity in entrepreneurship.


Academic trees: Engineering dean draws on Nigerian roots to impart respect for academic heritage

Jul. 8, 2015--Jacob Bernoulli, Leonhard Euler and Simeon Poisson are all icons in the world of mathematics, but to Babatunde Ogunnaike, they’re more than just pioneers who developed foundational principles of engineering — they’re part of his academic heritage. That heritage is so important to Ogunnaike, dean of the University of Delaware College of Engineering, that he passes it along to each of his graduate students in the form of an academic tree upon graduation.


Building engineers: UD College of Engineering embraces national Maker Movement

Jun. 17, 2015--Creative people across the globe are using off-the-shelf products and materials to design and build novel devices ranging from robots that carry out simple household chores to inexpensive cartridges that deliver life-saving medications. The so-called Maker Movement has gained momentum over the past several years due largely to new technologies like 3-D printers and readily available information about how to use them, as well as to a variety of support services offered through platforms such as Kickstarter, Indiegogo and Local Motors.


Engineering honors: Epps receives Owens-Corning Award for groundbreaking polymer research

Jun. 8, 2015--Thomas H. Epps, III has been selected as the 2015 winner of the Owens-Corning Early Career Award by the Materials Engineering and Sciences Division (MESD) of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). Epps is the Thomas and Kipp Gutshall Associate Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and associate professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Delaware. The award recognizes outstanding independent contributions to the scientific, technological, educational, or service areas of materials science and engineering by people who are under the age of 40.


Broad impact: Museum kiosk and radio show bring science from UD lab to the public

May 28, 2015--April Kloxin thinks science rocks, and she wants everyone from grade-schoolers to grandparents to think that too. So her research group at the University of Delaware is reaching out to the public through an interactive kiosk at the Delaware Museum of Natural History, as well as through a radio show on the University’s student-run radio station, WVUD.


UDEI symposium: UD Energy Institute event addresses clean energy challenge

May 18, 2015--Termites strike terror into the hearts of homeowners, but they could provide a nonpolluting way to convert coal to methane if microbes from their gut can be sent below ground as tiny miners. This novel concept was presented at the University of Delaware Energy Institute annual symposium at the Clayton Hall Conference Center on May 13. The event attracted more than 50 people from the energy community to address the clean energy challenge.


Engineering role models: Haines fund continues to support women in engineering

Apr. 28, 2015--When Richard Haines graduated from the University of Delaware in 1957 with a degree in chemical engineering, the number of women graduates in engineering could literally be counted on one hand. Today, one out of every four engineering undergraduates at UD is a woman, but Haines knew that a large, permanent base of dollars could help nudge the percentage upward. So in 2013, he and his wife, Janet, gave a $300,000 gift to the College of Engineering to help advance women in engineering.


Biotech understanding: Gov. Markell announces Delaware BioGENEius Challenge winners

Apr. 17, 2015--Gov. Jack Markell joined Kelvin Lee, director of the Delaware Biotechnology Institute (DBI), to recognize the finalists, an honorable mention awardee and three winners of the Delaware BioGENEius Challenge on Tuesday, April 14. The Delaware BioGENEius Challenge is a competition for high school students throughout the state who demonstrate an exemplary understanding of biotechnology through science research projects.


Research grants: Three UDRF Strategic Initiative grants support health-related research

Apr. 7, 2015--Three early-career researchers have won Strategic Initiative Grants from the University of Delaware Research Foundation, supporting their work on longstanding problems in bone health, medication delivery and immune system problems. The grants, each worth $45,000, pair young researchers with faculty mentors in studies that support the University's Strategic Initiative.


Small changes, big effects: Delaware Biotechnology Institute stimulates science interest in Sussex County

Apr. 2, 2015--The Delaware Biotechnology Institute (DBI), in partnership with the Sussex County Science Fair Committee, hosted a Family Science Night on Monday, March 30, at Beacon Middle School in Lewes, Delaware. The event, part of DBI's Science for All Delawareans initiative aimed to increase interest in middle school students in science, was judged an overwhelming success. More than 300 students, parents, teachers, public officials, and members of the media engaged in hands-on science activities to draw focus on the importance of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) training and jobs to the community.


Better battery membranes: UD researchers develop safer electrolytes and use novel technique to assess them

Apr. 2, 2015--Most of us have seen dramatic photographs of laptops and even cars that have burst into flames due to failures in lithium-ion batteries. On a much larger scale, battery fires grounded Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner jets for several months in 2013 while the company implemented new features to reduce the risk of overheating and combustion. The culprit in many of these spontaneous fires is the formation of branching crystalline masses called dendrites that form when lithium batteries undergo repeated charge-discharge cycles. Eventually the crystals "bridge" the cathode and anode, short circuiting the battery and facilitating the generation of sparks that can ignite the flammable liquid electrolyte sandwiched between the electrodes.


Ebola diagnostics: Company co-founded by UD alumnus gets FDA authorization for rapid Ebola testing

Mar. 27, 2015--Cepheid, a leading molecular diagnostics company, announced earlier this week it has received emergency use authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Xpert Ebola, a molecular diagnostic test for Ebola Zaire virus that delivers results in less than two hours. Thomas Gutshall, who received his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering at the University of Delaware in 1960, co-founded Cepheid and served as its first CEO and as chairman of the board from 1996 to 2013.


Self-assembled materials, InSPACE: UD's Eric Furst, colleagues imagine the next generation of smart materials

Mar. 24, 2015--The great thing about science, says University of Delaware engineer Eric Furst, is that "every question you ask, you start to answer, and end up with 10 more questions." This is especially true when some of that science is taking place 200 miles above the Earth's surface, where the relative freedom from gravity makes materials act in surprising ways. Furst, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and principal investigator of NASA's InSPACE (Investigating the Structures of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions) project, has been sending experiments up to the International Space Station since 2007.


Hydrogen fuel: Inexpensive, efficient bi-metallic electrocatalysts may open floodgates for hydrogen fuel

Mar. 16, 2015--University of Delaware researchers have discovered a cheap and efficient catalyst for converting water to hydrogen fuel (known as hydrogen evolution), a vital step in making hydrogen a viable and sustainable energy source. "The rising concerns about carbon dioxide emissions have led to a growing realization that it is not possible to sustain the world’s current development without a substitution of clean and renewable energy," writes Feng Jiao, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and a co-author on the paper published in the current issue of Nature Communications. "Hydrogen is a potential clean fuel for our society."


Norman Wagner: elected to the National Academy of Engineering

Norm is the fifth of our current active and emeritus faculty to be elected to the NAE, and he is certainly deserving, with a record of accomplishment that is appreciable in almost every conceivable category of professional activity: experimental, theoretical and computational research; scholarship, education and mentoring; invention and entrepreneurship; and academic and professional leadership.
To read the UDaily Article go here.


Leader in green chemistry: University's Richard Wool elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry

Jan. 28, 2015--Richard Wool, professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been named a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the United Kingdom’s professional society for chemical scientists and one of the largest such groups in the world. "I remember growing up in Ireland, and in my chemistry studies at University College Cork, being in absolute awe of people who were both members and fellows of the Royal Society of Chemistry," says Wool.


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2014


Tracking cell function: Antoniewicz receives journal's prestigious Daniel I.C. Wang Award

Jan. 15, 2015--By giving fellow scientists a window into the inner workings of the cell, Maciek R. Antoniewicz, DuPont Young Professor in the University of Delaware Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, fuels many researchers’ work in biotechnology and medicine. For his contribution of experimental, computational and analytic techniques that elucidate cell function, the journal Biotechnology and Bioengineering has selected Antoniewicz to receive its 2015 Daniel I.C. Wang Award.


NAI Emissions-free cars: Paper characterizes essential reaction for renewable energy fuel cells

Jan. 8, 2015--A University of Delaware research team is considering the important question of what it will take to create an affordable emissions-free car. The question, an issue of engineering and economics, is being studied by a team led by Yushan Yan, Distinguished Professor of Engineering.


NAI Fellow: Dean Ogunnaike named 2014 fellow of National Academy of Inventors

Dec. 17, 2014--Babatunde A. Ogunnaike, dean of the University of Delaware’s College of Engineering, is among 170 distinguished innovators who have been named 2014 fellows by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). In addition to his duties as dean, Ogunnaike is the William L. Friend Chair of Chemical Engineering and a professor in the Center for Systems Biology at the Delaware Biotechnology Institute


AAAS Fellow: UD engineering professor Wagner recognized for work in advancing science

Nov. 24, 2014--The University of Delaware’s Norman J. Wagner has been elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society. The association bestows the title of AAAS Fellow on members who are selected by their peers for scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.


Gores endow chair: Bob and Jane Gore donate $3 million for faculty chair in Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Oct. 7, 2014--Bob Gore, a 1959 graduate and 2010 honorary doctor of science recipient, and his wife, Jane, have contributed $3 million to establish an endowed faculty chair in the University of Delaware Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. The Bob and Jane Gore Centennial Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering honors the department's 100th anniversary, which was commemorated with a reunion celebration Sept. 19-21.


Chemical engineering turns 100: Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering celebrates centennial

Oct. 7, 2014--The University of Delaware Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering celebrated 100 years on campus with a centennial reunion Sept. 19-21. Current and former students came together with faculty to celebrate the department's past accomplishments and future plans. While much has changed over the past century, the department’s core values remain the same: to prepare students to become problem-solvers who can contribute solutions to the grand challenges and great debates of our time.


C&EN News highlights UD chemical and biomolecular engineering's new master's program in particle technology

Sep. 29, 2014--The programs are designed to attract and educate students with broad-ranging interests—from pharmaceutical manufacturing to wine making. They have been tailored through close collaboration with industry partners to provide students with hands-on training in select technical areas and exposure to nontraditional course material deemed critical by industry.


Platelets on demand: Research paves path to accelerating, enhancing platelet production

Sep. 25, 2014--Platelets are an expensive biomedical commodity. These microscopic cells that come to the rescue when our blood vessels need to be repaired cannot be frozen and are stable for only three to five days at room temperature. Although platelets are life-saving for accident victims, individuals undergoing chemotherapy, and people with diseases associated with a low platelet count, donated natural platelets are often in short supply, and their use comes with the risk of disease transmission between donors and recipients.


Named professor: Raul Lobo named Claire D. LeClaire professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Sep. 2, 2014--Raul Lobo, professor and director of the University of Delaware’s Center for Catalytic Science and Technology (CCST), has been appointed the Claire D. LeClaire Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, effective Sept. 1. Since joining the UD chemical and biomolecular engineering faculty in 1995, Lobo has been instrumental in the research of zeolites and other nanoporous materials on campus.


Plant-based materials: CCEI teams with consumer goods, car companies in renewable plastics research

Aug. 26, 2014--The University of Delaware's Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) recently announced a research program with the Plant PET Technology Collaborative (PTC) to explore methods of producing renewable beverage bottles, packaging, automotive components and fabric from biomass. Together, CCEI and PTC are working to accelerate the development and use of 100 percent plant-based materials to produce renewable materials used in consumer products.


University community reports recent announcements, presentations

Aug. 22, 2014--Babtunde A. Ogunnaike, dean of the College of Engineering, has announced that Kristi Kiick will become deputy dean and associate dean for external affairs; Yushan Yan will serve as associate dean for research and entrepreneurship; and Randy Duncan will become the first associate dean for diversity in the college’s history. The appointments are effective Sept. 1.


Engineering dean in China: Ogunnaike to deliver invited lectures in China, Brazil, South Africa

Aug. 5, 2014--University of Delaware Dean of Engineering Babatunde A. Ogunnaike will visit four universities and deliver several invited lectures in China this month.


ACS Fellows: UD's Furst, Kiick selected 2014 American Chemical Society Fellows

Jul. 29, 2014--Eric M. Furst and Kristi L. Kiick of the University of Delaware College of Engineering have been named to the 2014 American Chemical Society (ACS) Class of Fellows. ACS is the world's largest scientific society. Conferred annually since 2008, ACS Fellows are nominated by their peers for their outstanding accomplishments in scientific research, education and public service. Only 750 of the society's more than 161,000 members from academia, industry, government labs and small business have been distinguished with this honor.


Organic zeolites: Yan organic zeolite advance highlighted in Nature Communications

Jul. 23, 2014--Yushan Yan, Distinguished Professor of Engineering at the University of Delaware, is known worldwide for using nanomaterials to solve problems in energy engineering, environmental sustainability and electronics. His early academic work focused on zeolites, porous rock with a well-defined, crystalline structure. At the atomic scale, their pore size is so precisely decided that zeolites can separate molecules with size differences of merely a fraction of an angstrom (one-tenth of a nanometer), making them useful to the chemical and petroleum industries as molecular sieves for separation and catalysis processes.


Eminent engineer: UD's Ogunnaike named outstanding chemical engineer

Jul.21, 2014--The American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) has selected University of Delaware Dean of Engineering Babatunde A. Ogunnaike to receive the 2014 MAC Eminent Chemical Engineers Award. The award, given annually by the AIChE Minority Affairs Committee, recognizes outstanding chemical engineers for their role in fostering a diverse pool of talent in engineering and related disciplines. Ogunnaike shares the 2014 honor with Robert (Bobby) L. Satcher from NASA and Rosemarie D. Wesson of the National Science Foundation.


Fueling technological innovation: Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation to share in $100 million in DOE funding

Jun. 24, 2014--The University of Delaware has received $12 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy to continue its Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI), an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) that is developing technologies to convert biomass to biofuels and chemicals. UD was one of 32 EFRCs selected for funding totaling $100 million to further fundamental advances in energy production, storage and use, DOE announced in a press release. CCEI is one of 22 centers selected for continued funding from among the original 46 EFRCs funded in 2009, and one of 23 university-led projects.


NSF Career Award: UD's Jiao develops new catalysts to convert greenhouse gas to chemicals

Jun. 23, 2014--Feng Jiao, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Delaware, has received a highly competitive Faculty Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support his research to develop catalysts for converting greenhouse gases to useful chemicals. Earlier this year, Jiao developed a highly selective silver catalyst capable of electrochemically converting carbon dioxide — a greenhouse gas — to carbon monoxide with 92 percent efficiency. He reported the findings in Nature Communications.


Green design award: UD developed 'eco-leather' earns 2014 World Green Design Award

Jun.16, 2014--The World Green Design Organization has selected University of Delaware Professor Richard Wool's innovative "Eco-leather" for the 2014 World Green Design Award. Developed in Wool's laboratory at UD, eco-leather is an environmentally friendly, bio-based material that can be produced without the traditional leather tanning process.


Chemical engineering heights:Sandler honored by his alma mater, shares insights from undergrad education

Jun. 10, 2014--Stan Sandler is arguably one of the most decorated faculty members at the University of Delaware. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and he has received numerous awards, including being named one of the top 30 chemical engineering authors by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.


UD doctoral hooding: 195 new academic doctors welcomed into the world during ceremony on The Green

May 31, 2014--Amid whoops and bursts of applause, the University of Delaware welcomed 195 new academic doctors into the world on Friday, May 30, during the doctoral hooding ceremony held on The North Green. After the degree candidates and their advisers, led by a bagpiper, processed into the towering white tent in front of family and friends, James Richards, vice provost for graduate and professional education, greeted the crowd in multiple languages.


News Journal: UD Researchers Develop Tough Gloves

Prof. Norman Wagner and Richard Dombrowski have started STF Technologies, a start up company developing high-tech surgical gloves that can protect medical professionals from needle-sticks.


Splitting water: Researcher discovers inexpensive catalyst to produce oxygen and hydrogen gas

May 29, 2014--The University of Delaware's Yushan Yan believes that electrochemical energy engineering is the key to reducing humankind's reliance on combustion as the dominant player in energy conversion. All of his research is aimed at laying the foundation for a new era of affordable electrochemical devices, including fuel cells, electrolyzers, solar hydrogen generators, and redox flow batteries.


STEM at UD: Engineering majors organize competition to pique interest in STEM careers

May 22, 2014--High school students from seven Delaware high schools converged on campus earlier this month for the University of Delaware’s inaugural STEM at UD competition. The event was organized by four chemical and biomolecular engineering students involved with UD’s Blue Hen Leadership Program (BHLP) as part of a ongoing campus effort to improve K-12 interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).


Francis Alison Award: Lenhoff selected for University's highest faculty honor

May 13, 2014--Abraham Lenhoff, Allan P. Colburn Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has received the 2014 Francis Alison Faculty Award. The award, the University’s highest competitive faculty honor, was established by the Board of Trustees in 1978 to recognize the faculty members who best demonstrate the combination of scholarship and teaching exemplified by the Rev. Francis Alison, founder of the institution that is now UD. The annual award also confers membership in the Francis Alison Society.


Puncture-resistant gloves: UD spin-off company is working to develop puncture-resistant surgical gloves

May 13, 2014--Health care workers in the United States suffer an estimated 385,000 needlestick injuries per year, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Up to 90 percent of these injuries occur in the hand and can expose surgeons, nurses and other health care staff to infection from blood-borne pathogens such as HIV and hepatitis B and C. The average cost of a needlestick injury to a hospital is $2,500.


Engineering bone repair: Researchers seek to develop non-viral carrier for gene therapy use in bone repair

May 13, 2014--A team of researchers from the University of Delaware and Thomas Jefferson University has been awarded a $1.4-million grant from the National Institutes of Health to explore the use of non-viral gene therapy to enhance bone repair. The work will be led by Millicent Sullivan, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at UD, while Theresa Freeman, associate professor of orthopedic surgery at Jefferson, will lead a collaborating team at TJU.


Unanimous vote: Faculty Senate gives thumbs down on data center power facility

May 7, 2014--The University of Delaware Faculty Senate unanimously approved a resolution recommending that the University not proceed with the construction of a data center with a power-generating facility on the Science, Research and Advanced Technology (STAR) Campus. The resolution, which was approved by a 43-0 vote with eight abstentions, came during the last regular meeting of the spring semester, held Monday, May 5, in Gore Hall.


Papoutsakis honored: Delaware Bio holds 2014 annual awards gala celebration

Apr. 28, 2014--Terry Papoutsakis, Eugene du Pont Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, only needed to scan the room at Delaware Bio's 2014 annual awards gala to see just how deeply the roots of the bioscience community stretch in Delaware. About 300 of the area's top leaders in science, academics, industry and the medical community gathered inside the DuPont Country Club for the seventh annual event that honors the work being done by local individuals, companies and educators to foster the state’s bioscience community.


Nano shake-up: UD researchers demonstrate that processing can affect size of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery

Apr. 14, 2014--Significant advances have been made in chemotherapy over the past decade, but targeting drugs to cancer cells while avoiding healthy tissues continues to be a major challenge. Nanotechnology has unlocked new pathways for targeted drug delivery, including the use of nanocarriers, or capsules, that can transport cargoes of small-molecule therapeutics to specific locations in the body.


CCEI research: Center announces renewable chemicals research with ExxonMobil

Apr. 1, 2014--The Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI), a U.S. Department of Energy-Energy Frontier Research Center led by the University of Delaware, has announced a two-year program with ExxonMobil to research renewable chemicals from biomass. The research will focus on converting lignocellulosic (non-food) biomass such as trees and grasses to polymers that are identical to existing petrochemical products.


Neutron Day: UD hosts one-day symposium with National Center for Neutron Research

Mar. 25, 2014--The University of Delaware's first "Neutron Day" symposium in 2012 drew about 30 participants. This year, the event attracted more than 100 attendees, reflecting the rapidly expanding use of neutron scattering as a research tool. Neutron scattering, which shows the location and behavior of atoms, allows researchers to see in real time how material structure changes with variations in temperature, pressure, and magnetic or electronic fields.


Neutron scattering experts: NSSA elects UD professors Glyde, Wagner to fellowship program

Mar. 6, 2014--University of Delaware professors Henry Glyde and Norman Wagner have been selected as fellows of the Neutron Scattering Society of America (NSSA). Founded in 1992, the NSSA has more than 1,000 members worldwide who help promote neutron scattering research. Designation as an NSSA Fellow distinguishes Glyde and Wagner among the top one half of one percent of their peers.


'People, Projects, Partners': Spring semester lunchtime speaker series begins Feb. 10 in ISE Lab

Feb. 6, 2014--The University of Delaware’s Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Laboratory will hold a free lunchtime speaker series during spring semester featuring a variety of community engagement activities in which UD faculty, staff and students are involved. The series, "People, Projects and Partners," begins Monday, Feb. 10, and will be held on Mondays from 12:30-2 p.m. in Room 110. Each session will focus on two projects, with each speaker presenting a TED-style talk, followed by a discussion period..


Renewable energy resources: UD researchers report on new catalyst to convert greenhouse gases into chemicals

Jan. 30, 2014--A team of researchers at the University of Delaware has developed a highly selective catalyst capable of electrochemically converting carbon dioxide — a greenhouse gas — to carbon monoxide with 92 percent efficiency. The carbon monoxide then can be used to develop useful chemicals. The researchers recently reported their findings in Nature Communications.



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2013


Green innovator: UD's Wool wins Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award

Dec. 11, 2013--The Environmental Protection Agency has honored the University of Delaware’s Richard Wool with its Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award for his extensive work developing bio-based materials to support the green energy infrastructure. Wool was recognized today during a presentation at EPA headquarters in Washington, D.C.


International symposium: UD's Epps invited participant at EU-US Frontiers in Engineering Symposium

Oct. 16, 2013--The University of Delaware's Thomas H. Epps, III, is one of 30 early-career engineers nationwide invited to attend the 2013 European Union-United States Frontiers of Engineering Symposium to be held Nov. 21-23 in Chantilly, France. Organized by the National Academy of Engineering and the European Council of Applied Sciences and Engineering, the symposium will focus on nanosensors, big data, the future of transportation, and wireless broadband. A total of 60 participants, 30 from the United States and 30 from Europe, will discuss their leading-edge research.


Engineering excellence: UD's Wagner to receive Thomas Baron Award at AIChE national meeting

Oct. 10, 2013--Norman Wagner, Alvin B. and Julia O. Stiles Professor and former chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been selected to receive the Thomas Baron Award at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers’ (AIChE) annual meeting Nov. 3-8 in San Francisco. Given annually, the award recognizes outstanding scientific or technical accomplishments that have had significant impact in the field of fluid-particle systems or a related field.


Inspiring future engineers: UD camp fosters interest in math, science and engineering

As American society and the world advance technologically, many believe it is increasingly important to support children with a budding interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). To help expose local elementary students to the multi-faceted and innovative STEM fields, the University of Delaware College of Engineering hosted its annual Young Engineers Camp in collaboration with JPMorgan Chase July 22-26 on the Newark campus.


Biochemical engineering excellence: UD's Papoutsakis to receive Daniel I.C. Wang Award from AIChE

Sept. 25, 2013--Terry Papoutsakis, Eugene du Pont Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been selected to receive the Daniel I.C. Wang Award for excellence in biochemical engineering from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Society for Biological Engineering. Papoutsakis, who is affiliated with the Delaware Biotechnology Institute, is cited for pioneering the genetic exploration of clostridia, anaerobic bacteria that are ubiquitous in soil and can cause infections in wounds.


Engineering honors: National society selects UD's Lee for 2013 Professional Progress Award

July 8, 2013--In 1948, University of Delaware Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering patriarch Allan P. Colburn received the first Professional Progress Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). Now, on the 75th anniversary of Colburn joining the University of Delaware faculty, Kelvin H. Lee, Gore Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and director of the Delaware Biotechnology Institute (DBI), has been selected as AIChE’s 2013 Professional Progress Award recipient.


New engineering dean: Ogunnaike named dean of the College of Engineering effective July 1

July 1, 2013--Babatunde A. Ogunnaike, William L. Friend Chaired Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been named dean of engineering following a nationwide search, UD President Patrick T. Harker announced today. The appointment is effective July 1. As dean, Ogunnaike will be responsible for the academic leadership of more than 130 faculty members in six departments with a total enrollment of over 3,000 undergraduate and graduate students. Additionally, the College of Engineering is home to a wide range of disciplines that support world-class programs and 14 research centers.


Congratulations to Kelvin Lee as the winner of the 2013 Professional Progress Award of the AIChE. This award is given to an individual under the age of 45 for outstanding progress in the field of chemical engineering, and as one of the Institute Awards is always particularly competitive. Therefore Kelvin's selection to receive the award is a major accomplishment. It's also one of which we're particularly proud because the first winner of the award was Allan Colburn, in 1948, and this year is the 75th anniversary of Colburn's joining UD. His 1948 award lecture was written up in the NY Times.


Pew Scholar: UD's Kloxin selected 2013 Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences

June 13, 2013--April Kloxin, a University of Delaware chemical and biomolecular engineer whose research is pushing the boundaries of what is known about fibrosis, has been named a 2013 Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences by the Pew Charitable Trusts.


What happens when I poke it? Q&A featuring Eric Furst

June 5, 2013--Eric Furst is a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and director of the Center for Molecular Engineering and Thermodynamics at the University of Delaware, US. His lab investigates the physics and chemistry underlying the behavior of colloidal, polymeric, biomolecular, and other "soft" materials.


High-powered groups: In face of dwindling funding, UD Energy Institute advocates team approach

May 14, 2013--In the face of sequestration, it is a fact that funding sources for research are dwindling. Yet research is still needed to address the world’s global energy challenges. According to Michael Klein, director of the University of Delaware Energy Institute (UDEI), biomass, wind, solar, fuel cells, etc., all have a part to play in future energy solutions. UDEI’s role is to bridge the various academic disciplines that support these energy areas and get people working together.


Germany bound: Graduate student selected to participate in 63rd Lindau Nobel Laureate meeting

May 14, 2013--Elizabeth Kelley, a fifth year graduate student in the University of Delaware’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, will have the opportunity to share her research on targeted drug delivery at the 63rd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting to be held June 30-July 5 in Lindau, Germany.


Pioneering polymer research: Delaware Bio selects UD's Kiick to receive Academic Research Award

May 6, 2013--University of Delaware professor Kristi Kiick is currently developing a range of novel hydrogels in order to improve the treatment of cardiovascular conditions as well as the delivery of antibodies to protect against toxins. The polymers that comprise the hydrogels are engineered to regulate the rate of drug delivery and to protect the therapeutic molecules from degrading before reaching their destination.


NSF recognition: UD's Kloxin receives prestigious National Science Foundation Career Award

April 2, 2013--April Kloxin, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Delaware, has been awarded a $500,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development Award to study the extracellular signals that regulate tissue stability, disease and repair in the body. According to Kloxin, understanding the complex interplay between cells and their external environment is an essential part of designing therapeutic approaches to prevent the progression of disease or to direct tissue regeneration.


Scouting careers in engineering: Girl Scouts participate in three-part series to encourage interest in engineering

Mar. 21, 2013--Girl Scouts gathered in Spencer Laboratory March 15 as University of Delaware professor Richard Wool described how chicken feathers can help clean up an oil spill. Wool, a professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, shared that engineers are creative problems solvers and that green engineering is the science of the future.


Young investigator: Engineering's Sullivan to present at Georgia Tech bioengineering workshop

Feb. 25, 2013--Millicent Sullivan, assistant professor in the University of Delaware’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, has been selected to present at the 2013 Georgia Tech Frontiers in Bioengineering Workshop, Feb. 25-26. Held at the Georgia Tech Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience in Atlanta, the workshop brings together the world’s leading bioengineers to discuss cutting-edge research and identify critical long-term challenges in bioimaging, biomaterials and cellular and molecular bioengineering.


Targeting treatment: Research aims to improve personal care, medicinal products

Feb. 12, 2013--For those who have wondered why shampoo moisturizes hair rather than drying it out, or how antidandruff shampoo works, it is due to a process known as coacervation. The chemicals or organic materials that treat dandruff or moisturize skin are packaged with polymer-surfactant complexes in what is known as a coacervate. Coacervates then release the materials, such as oil droplets that moisturize hair, when exposed to an external compound such as water.


NASA

Farm fresh fuels?: UD joins team working to turn farm refuse into useful biofuels, chemicals

Feb. 1, 2013--The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently announced $25 million in funding to four programs engaged in biomass biofuel, and farm-based technology research. Researchers from the University of Delaware are teaming up with the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) program at the Eastern Regional Research Center in Wyndmoor, Pa., which received a $6.87 million grant to develop farm-central biofuel technologies.Dion Vlachos, director of the Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) and Elizabeth Inez Kelley Professor at UD, will lead modeling studies focused on making fuels from bio-oil as a member of the ARS team.


NASA

ISS Update: Studying Smart Fluids in Space

Jan. 30, 2013--Eric Furst joins NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries in the Mission Control Center in Houston via telephone to discuss the InSpace-3 experiment taking place aboard the International Space Station.




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2012


DBI-DNREC

Driving energy solutions: UD researcher among 66 selected to share in energy technology funding

Dec. 3, 2012--University of Delaware professor Yushan Yan is among America’s top scientists and engineers working to develop transformational energy technology solutions. His work is one of 66 cutting-edge research projects selected for more than $130 million in funding from the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) OPEN 2012 program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced Nov. 28.


DBI-DNREC

Visiting professor: Epps named visiting professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Nov. 14, 2012--Thomas H. Epps, III, Thomas and Kipp Gutshall Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been named one of six new Martin Luther King, Jr., visiting professors/scholars at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). As an MIT visiting professor, Epps will collaborate with Timothy Swager, John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry at MIT, on research focused on controlled nanoscale assembly processes for organic electronic applications.


DBI-DNREC

Future of bioenergy: Delaware Biotechnology Institute partners with DNREC in biofuel project

Nov. 8, 2012--As part of a five-year, $50,000 grant supporting state greenhouse gas reduction projects, the Delaware Biotechnology Institute (DBI) has partnered with the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) in response to the need for 36 billion gallons of petroleum-based fuel to be replaced by biofuels by 2022, according to the Renewable Fuel Standard of 2007. The Framework for Minimizing Energy Input and Environmental Impact in Delaware grant is a joint effort between DBI and Delaware State University (DSU) to create an education and outreach pipeline, as well as training, for the next generation of scientists and Delawareans as part of a sustainable agriculturally based industrial ecology.


Improving Batteries

Improving batteries: UD doctoral student studies ways to improve lithium battery performance

Nov. 7, 2012--Lithium batteries are used in many devices such as cell phones, computers and cameras, among others. University of Delaware doctoral student Wei-Fan Kuan is investigating ways to improve membranes used in lithium batteries by capitalizing on the innate properties of block copolymers.


Sustainability Task Force

Clean energy: UD faculty highlight fuel cell advances during symposium at Clayton Hall

Oct. 25, 2012--More than 40 researchers representing industry, government and academia gathered at Clayton Hall Conference Center on the University of Delaware's Newark campus Oct. 17-18 to discuss the important role of fuel cells in clean energy technology. The event was sponsored by the University of Delaware Energy Institute (UDEI) and organized by the Center for Fuel Cell Research (CFCR). Presentations covered current research aimed at improving the performance and durability of fuel cells, reducing their costs, and exploring new methods to produce hydrogen renewably from sunlight.


Space Research

2012 Mangone Scholar: Antoniewicz receives Mangone Young Scholars Award

Oct. 22, 2012--The University of Delaware's Francis Alison Society has selected Maciek R. Antoniewicz, DuPont Young Professor in chemical and biomolecular engineering, to receive its 2012 Gerard J. Mangone Young Scholar award. Named in honor of a distinguished University professor, the award is given annually to promising and accomplished young faculty. Recipients are chosen by fellow faculty members who have received the Francis Alison Award, the University's highest faculty honor.


Graduate Travel Award Winner

Graduate Travel Award Winner - Wei Fan Kuan

Congratulations to Wei Fan Kuan for winning the Graduate Travel Award, which will be presented to him at the ACS National Meeting in New Orleans in 2013. The ACS Division of Polymer Chemistry's Membership Committee sponsors a program to provide funding for polymer graduate students to travel to National ACS meetings to present the results of their research. Only members of the ACS AND the Division of Polymer Chemistry who currently study at U.S. institutions are eligible for this travel award.


Space Research

Leading the way: NIST awards UD $7 million for continued neutron scattering research

Oct. 9, 2012--The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has awarded the University of Delaware's Center for Neutron Science $7 million for continued neutron scattering research. Neutron scattering is a nanoscale measurement technique similar to X-ray and light scattering that is used to examine a material's structure at the molecular, nano- and meso-scales. The technique is useful in engineering new nanomaterials for grand-challenge problems ranging from energy storage to biomaterials for improving human health.


Green Liaisons: UD Green Liaisons lunch program to focus on Colburn green roof

Oct. 8, 2012--The University of Delaware Green Liaisons will meet for the first lunchtime presentation of the 2012-13 academic year from 1:15-2:15 p.m., Friday, Oct. 19, in 206 Trabant University Center. The focus of the meeting will be the green roof at Colburn Laboratory.


Space Research

Out of this world: UD professor reports smart fluids research in scientific journal

Sept. 18, 2012--Imagine a computer chip that can assemble itself. According to Eric M. Furst, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Delaware, engineers and scientists are closer to making this and other scalable forms of nanotechnology a reality as a result of new milestones in using nanoparticles as building blocks in functional materials.


Space Research

Biotechnology award: Engineering's Wilfred Chen wins Biotechnology Progress Award

Sept. 17, 2012--Wilfred Chen, Gore Professor of Chemical Engineering in the University of Delaware’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, will receive the 2012 Biotechnology Progress Award for Excellence in Biological Engineering Publication at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) annual meeting in Pittsburgh, Oct. 28-Nov. 2. Given annually, the award recognizes outstanding contributions to literature in biomedical engineering, biological engineering, biotechnology, biochemical engineering and related fields.


Space Research

Green Liaisons events: Sustainability Task Force announces Green Liaisons Lunch schedule

Sept. 13, 2012--The University of Delaware’s Sustainability Task Force has announced the Green Liaisons Lunch schedule for the 2012-13 academic year. Once a month, Green Liaisons are invited to attend a lunchtime presentation on the small steps that can be implemented by every student, faculty and staff member in order to make UD a greener place to learn, work and live.


Space Research

Neutron scattering advance: UD engineers develop new instrumentation to study a fluid's microstructure

July 13, 2012--A team of researchers from the University of Delaware and two national laboratories have developed a new scientific instrument capable of studying the microstructure of complex fluids, polymers, nanomaterials and surfactant solutions using neutron scattering techniques. The advance adds the ability for researchers to study time-dependent deformations (instances where fluids or solutions distort or change shape over time), a capability not previously available.


Space Research

Opposites attract: UD professor reports milestone in fuel cell membrane research

June 29, 2012--It looks like a plastic candy wrapper that's been charred on both sides, but it may hold the solution to commercially viable fuel cells. About the thickness of a human hair, it is actually a thin polymer membrane sandwiched between two catalysts. The work is that of Yushan Yan, Distinguished Professor of Engineering at the University of Delaware, who is known for developing new catalysts and membranes to reduce the cost and improve the durability of fuel cells.


Space Research

IGERT funding: NSF grant supports work in systems biology of cells in engineered environments

June 7, 2012--With the responsibility of great research comes the requirement of educators to also transcend traditional boundaries by integrating multi-disciplinary knowledge into their work. To do this, they must build a team of experts in other fields to integrate programs that will broaden the capabilities of future leaders. In this case, a group of University of Delaware faculty have been awarded a National Science Foundation grant under the Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) program to train doctoral students in the area of systems biology of cells in engineered environments (SBE2). Led by principal investigator Kelvin Lee, Gore Professor of Chemical Engineering and director of the Delaware Biotechnology Institute, the grant will bring together experts across the University -- drawn from the colleges of Engineering; Agriculture and Natural Resources; Earth, Ocean, and Environment; Arts and Sciences; and Business and Economics -- for a comprehensive, intense work/study program designed to create the science leaders of tomorrow.


Space Research

Career development chair: Epps named Gutshall Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

May 31, 2012--Thomas H. Epps, III, associate professor at the University of Delaware, has been named the Thomas and Kipp Gutshall Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. The endowed position is funded through a generous gift from UD alumnus Thomas Gutshall and his wife, Kipp. It is meant to reward exceptional young faculty talent. Unlike senior endowed chairs, the designation may rotate among young faculty periodically, depending upon need.


Space Research

Space research: Sixth annual Delaware Space Grant Research Symposium held

May 23, 2012--The Delaware Space Grant Consortium, of which the University of Delaware is an affiliate, held its annual symposium April 27 on the UD campus to highlight research work that has occurred as a result of funding support from the NASA Space Grant program. The keynote address was given by Phil Spampinato, director of government business development at ILC Dover in Frederica, Del.


Stanley Sandler

Computer technology teaching: American Society of Engineering Education honors UD's Sandler

May 9, 2012--Robert Pagels and Gealina Dun have been selected as the recipients of the Alexander J. Taylor Sr. and Emalea Pusey Warner awards, respectively, as the outstanding man and woman of the University of Delaware's 2012 graduating class. The awards are given annually by the UD Alumni Association to recognize the senior man and woman who most exemplify leadership, academic success and community service.


Robert Pagels

Top seniors: Robert Pagels, Gealina Dun named outstanding man, woman of the graduating class

May 9, 2012--Robert Pagels and Gealina Dun have been selected as the recipients of the Alexander J. Taylor Sr. and Emalea Pusey Warner awards, respectively, as the outstanding man and woman of the University of Delaware's 2012 graduating class. The awards are given annually by the UD Alumni Association to recognize the senior man and woman who most exemplify leadership, academic success and community service.


Tyler Josephson

May 2012--Tyler Josephson - Winner of the 2012 George W. Laird Merit Fellowship

Congratulations to Tyler Josephson, winner of the 2012 George W. Laird Merit Fellowship! This fellowship is given to honor the memory of George W. Laird, who attended the University of Delaware, and was awarded a bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering with highest honors in 1968 and a master's degree in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in 1971. Full-time first year graduate students in Engineering in the process of completing their first year of graduate study at the University of Delaware are eligible for this award. The objective of the fellowship is to encourage the recipient to become engaged in a broadening intellectual pursuit which may or may not be of direct application to the recipient's chosen field of study. Tyler was chosen by a selection committee consisting of members representing the College of Engineering, the University, the community, and the family of George W. Laird. In its evaluations, the committee stresses balanced excellence, combining demonstrated intellectual capability with a strong emphasis placed on human qualities such as character, maturity, sense of humor, creativity, ingenuity, and imagination, coupled with practical skills, perseverance and the common sense necessary to execute ideas.


Elizabeth Mahoney

NSF Graduate Research Fellows: Ten win prestigious graduate fellowships from National Science Foundation

May 2, 2012--Ten University of Delaware students and recent alumni have received National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Program Fellowships. Numerous Nobel Prize winners are among past recipients of the prestigious award. Reserved for outstanding students pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM), these NSF fellowships provide a three-year annual stipend of $30,000, plus a $10,500 cost of education allowance for tuition and fees, opportunities for international research and professional development, and the freedom to conduct research at any accredited U.S. institution of graduate education they choose.


Abraham Lenhoff

April 25: Inaugural lecture

April 18, 2012--Abraham Lenhoff, the University of Delaware's Allan P. Colburn Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, will deliver an inaugural lecture at 4 p.m., Wednesday, April 25, in 116 Gore Hall. His presentation, "The Colburn Papers", uses the University of Delaware Library's collection of Colburn's early papers to explore characteristics of chemical engineering education and research in the 1920s and 1930s.


Eleftherios Papoutsakis

Investing in bioschence

April 17, 2012--The Delaware Biotechnology Institute and the Delaware Economic Development Office have announced eight research projects through the recently launched Delaware Bioscience Center for Advanced Technology (Bioscience CAT). These CAT grants link researchers from Delaware academic and research institutions with local bioscience companies to create advanced technologies while investing in the bioscience community to ensure Delaware competes on the world stage in biotechnology innovation.


Alexandra Bayles

Goldwater Scholar: Alexandra Bayles

April 16, 2012--University of Delaware junior Alexandra Bayles, a chemical and biomolecular engineering major, has earned a scholarship from the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation. The scholarship program, which honors the late U.S. Sen. Barry M. Goldwater of Arizona, aims to inspire outstanding science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) students to pursue STEM-related careers. It is the premier undergraduate award of its kind, providing awardees up to $7,500 per year toward tuition, fees, books and room and board costs.


Sustainable curiosity - UD students hold inaugural TEDx event on campus

April 11, 2012--Faculty and students are invited to participate in the first TEDx event at the University of Delaware to be held from noon to 3:30 p.m., Sunday, April 15, in 115 Purnell Hall. The theme for the inaugural UD event is “sustainable curiosity” and includes eight faculty, student and alumni speakers. Combined with a TEDTalks video, the speakers will facilitate small group discussions.


David Colby

Huntington's disease

April 5, 2012--University of Delaware assistant professor David W. Colby is co-author of a paper in the March 23 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry that suggests protein misfolding may occur early in the pathogenesis, or development, of Huntington’s disease. Huntington’s disease (HD) is one of several neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease or prion disease, associated with proteins that fold into abnormal structures. HD is characterized by progressive motor impairment, cognitive decline and behavioral abnormalities, and ultimately death.


Wool

Good to be green

March 22, 2012--In today’s day and age, advances in green chemistry are leading the way for remarkable sustainability efforts. Evidenced in high-performance composites and resins made from soybean and newspapers, as well as computer circuit boards made from chicken feathers, in the hands of researchers, ordinary materials lend themselves to the creation of renewable resources. Among those leading the charge at the University of Delaware is Richard Wool, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and a known authority in green chemistry.


CCEI

Advancing scientific discovery

March 12, 2012--Every other Wednesday, University of Delaware graduate student Michael Salciccioli meets with faculty, students and postdoctoral researchers from UD along with colleagues from the University of Pennsylvania who are conducting research in UD’s Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI), an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the Department of Energy. During these meetings, students and postdocs present their research, discuss challenges in their work and collaborate with their peers as well as the faculty. These bi-weekly meetings are designed to nurture ingenuity and multidisciplinary teamwork at a highly synergistic level.


For-the-record: Presentations

February 17, 2012--Norman J. Wagner, Alvin B. and Julia O. Stiles Professor and chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, co-chaired the Gordon Research Conference’s Colloidal, Macromolecular and Polyelectrolyte Solutions program Feb. 5-10 in Ventura, Calif. The conference, which runs every two years, brings together experts in the fields of material science, complex fluid physics, engineering, biochemistry and biophysics to discuss the effects and impacts colloidal, macromolecule and polyelectrolyte solutions have on nanomaterials and particles, drug delivery, energy applications, self-assembly and rheology.


Babatunde Ogunnaike

Engineering elite

February 10, 2012--National Academy of Engineering elects UD's Babatunde Ogunnaike. A University of Delaware engineering professor noted for his contributions to advances in process systems, process engineering practice and systems engineering education has been elected to the prestigious National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Babatunde A. Ogunnaike, William L. Friend Chair of Chemical Engineering and interim dean of the College of Engineering, is among the NAE’s 66 new members and 10 foreign associates announced in a press release Feb 9.


Yushan Yan

March 7: Yan inaugural lecture

Feb. 9, 2012--Yushan Yan, who has been named the University of Delaware's Distinguished Professor of Engineering, will deliver his inaugural lecture at 4 p.m., Wednesday, March 7, in 115 Purnell Hall. Those planning to attend are asked to RSVP by calling 302-831-2401 or emailing engr-events@udel.edu.


Jingguang Chen

Catalysis Research

Feb. 1, 2012--The Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded the University of Delaware $1.3 million for continued catalysis research using facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The three-year grant builds on work initiated by UD Prof. Jingguang Chen in 2005 when he co-founded the synchrotron catalysis consortium (SCC). SCC promotes the use of synchrotron techniques for cutting-edge catalysis research under in-situ conditions. Chen is the consortium’s lead principal investigator.




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2011


Milton Harper

Remembering Allan Colburn

Dec. 21, 2011--When Milton Harper was a chemical engineering graduate student at the University of Delaware in the 1940, he was one of only about a half dozen students in the program-all males. The department was housed in a wing of Brown Laboratory, where there were no computers and the most modern piece of equipment was a distillation column.


Professor Furst

UD chemical engineer guest authors PNAS commentary on directing colloidal assembly

Dec. 21, 2011--The University of Delaware's Eric M. Furst authored a commentary in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) advance online edition Dec. 19.


Papoutsakis

In search of new biofuels

Nov. 8, 2011--Biofuels are fuels made from renewable resources, such as agricultural and forest products and byproducts. Unlike their non-renewable fossil fuel counterparts, such as oil, their increased usage has the potential to reduce pollution and U.S. dependence on foreign resources. Their production, however, is problematic. Biofuels must be produced quickly and at high concentrations in order to make them economically feasible. Unfortunately, the process can be toxic to cells necessary in their manufacture.


Carissa Young

AIChE honors

Nov. 2, 2011--Carissa Young, a graduate student in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Delaware, was honored for her work in cellular engineering at the 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) annual meeting in Minneapolis, Oct. 16-21. Young, who is advised by Anne S. Robinson, professor of chemical engineering, focuses her research on evaluating cellular quality control mechanisms in a model organism by monitoring molecular interactions, protein trafficking, organelle dynamics and biogenesis.


Norman Wagner

Fueling a sustainable future

Oct. 25, 2011--Transportation at the University of Delaware became more environmentally friendly recently, when the campus bus fleet began using biodiesel produced by undergraduate engineering students to, in part, fuel its travel. The project is a collaborative effort between transportation and engineering, inspired by the donation of a biodiesel processor last spring by UD chemical engineering alumnus James Seferis, who received a doctorate in 1977.


Wilfred Chen

Nov. 2: Wilfred Chen inaugural lecture

October 20, 2011--Wilfred Chen, who has been named the University of Delaware’s Gore Professor of Chemical Engineering, will deliver his inaugural lecture at 4 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 2, in 140 Smith Hall.


Michael Klein

Oct. 26: Michael Klein inaugural lecture

Oct. 17, 2011--Michael T. Klein, who has been named the University of Delaware’s Dan Rich Chair of Energy and professor of chemical engineering, will deliver his inaugural lecture at 4 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 26, in 140 Smith Hall.


Rakesh Agrawal

UD alumnus, Rakesh Agrawal, among nation's top scientists and innovators

Oct. 7, 2011--University of Delaware alumnus Rakesh Agrawal, a member of the chemical engineering faculty at Purdue University, is among five individuals named by President Barack Obama as recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation.


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